Making Lumber

This log was slightly too big for my chainsaw mill back in the day but before I got around to cutting it with the larger chainsaw mill, I started building my bandsaw mill. I really wasn't sure what would be in this log but I figured there would at least be a few areas of curl and spalting. Looks like this log produced some really interesting pieces of wood so I'll be set on small pieces of figured maple for a while.
I frequently get questions regarding the dimensions and construction of my loading arch.  I've put together this page to illustrate the details of the arch for reference.
I picked up this silver maple log from a backyard in Robbinsdale, MN. This log has two crotches and from the outside looks to have a lot of figure within it. There is plenty of undulation visible on the outside and the large crotches looks to have produced a lot of compression figure. The log is 4’ wide at the butt and the crotch splays to 5’ wide. Overall length is just over 6’.
I needed to set up the foundation for the slabs that will be sawn from the silver maple log that I picked up in my urban logging video and I've received many questions on drying outdoors and setting up the stack bases. So I'm answering questions on my outdoor stacks while demonstrating how I set up the foundations for the stacks.
Last spring, I saw a firewood posting on craigslist for some really large logs. The trees were removed as part of a street widening project. I was able to get 5 of them starting from the smallest. The biggest logs I was unable to get due to their size. This crotch section was just one part of a much larger silver maple tree. This was the last log that I picked up and is now the last log from the group to go onto the mill.
Last fall, Donavan had an elm tree removed from his yard that had died. The trunk was too heavy to be lifted out of his backyard with the crane that was used to remove the rest of the tree. We planned to mill the trunk in place with the chainsaw mill and after making a few cuts with the chainsaw mill, we removed enough weight so the log could be moved with a bobcat. We loaded it onto my trailer and cut the rest of the log on my homemade bandsaw mill.
Setting up a flat base for stacking lumber to dry is and essential part of the drying process.  It can be a tedious process and if the base changes or the stack needs to move, you have to level the area again.  I decided to make some base levelers for my lumber stacks so I can quickly, easily, and accurately ensure a flat base for drying my lumber.
Last spring, I saw a firewood posting on craigslist for some really large logs.  The trees were removed as part of a street widening project.  I was able to get 5 of them starting from the smallest.  The biggest logs I was unable to get due to their size.  The crotch section was just one part of a much larger tree.