Making Lumber

Last time we sliced up the longer section of this silver maple tree that was topped and left standing for 5 years. This time we'll continue on and slice up the shorter section. This one is from the base of the tree with a diameter close to 3'.
There's a few factors to consider when selecting a winch for urban logging. What size you need will greatly depend on the size of logs you're going after and potentially planning for even larger logs than you're expecting now. The short answer is to buy bigger than you need and not worry about it as much. The cost difference between the different capacities isn't very large. The only downside is as the capacity increases the winch gets heavier but if you're not moving it around and leaving it bolted to your trailer, this isn't really an issue.
After having taken my sawmill apart to paint it, I wanted to make sure everything went back together correctly and is still calibrated. I saved this offcut from a log I cut about a year ago so I would be able to make a wide test cut to verify the saw still cuts consistently.
This time we'll install the motor that will drive the sawhead lift and complete the sprocket installation that will route the chain from one lifting column to the other.
I got a call about a walnut tree that was coming down and this was a really fun outing.  The loading was just a bit challenging which made it more interesting than just driving up to a pile of logs.  You know how I love a good adventure!
Cutting big and small cookies from logs on my bandsaw mill, testing a few drying scenarios, and taking a look at the results one year later.
This log was slightly too big for my chainsaw mill back in the day but before I got around to cutting it with the larger chainsaw mill, I started building my bandsaw mill. I really wasn't sure what would be in this log but I figured there would at least be a few areas of curl and spalting. Looks like this log produced some really interesting pieces of wood so I'll be set on small pieces of figured maple for a while.
I frequently get questions regarding the dimensions and construction of my loading arch.  I've put together this page to illustrate the details of the arch for reference.
I picked up this silver maple log from a backyard in Robbinsdale, MN. This log has two crotches and from the outside looks to have a lot of figure within it. There is plenty of undulation visible on the outside and the large crotches looks to have produced a lot of compression figure. The log is 4’ wide at the butt and the crotch splays to 5’ wide. Overall length is just over 6’.